How’s Your State Doing on Donor Protection Measures?

In my last post I promised information about living donation-related protections and benefits, by state. As I mentioned, while awaiting passage of a federal Living Donor Protection Act, more than half of states now have their own version (28 at last count). In fact, like the one we’re supporting in North Carolina, some actually are more generous than the federal version (by including paid leave for state employees who donate).

United States Map With State Names Pdf Valid Printable Map Of | Printable Map Of The United States Pdf – Printable US Maps

But the LDPA is just one way that states can encourage living donation. Financial supports and job protections are other critical ones. Are you considering being a living donor, or have you donated recently? Do you know what the relevant tax provisions and protections are in your state–or in a state you may be looking at? It’s worth doing your homework.

The National Kidney Foundation has a terrific resource in a map you can click on to find out what donation-related laws and protections a particular state offers. Does it have a Living Donor Protection Act, or similar insurance-discrimination protections? Does it also have job-protected living donor leave for private employees? How about for state employees? What about paid leave? What about tax deductions? Even better, what about tax credits?

The American Kidney Fund website also features an invaluable resource: a state report card. It rates each state based on important donation-related measures and provides an overall rating on how well that state encourages living donation and removes barriers. Not surprisingly, only a few states merit an A: Arkansas, Connecticut, and Louisiana. Glad to see that more than a dozen at least get Bs, but nearly as many have Cs, a few get Ds (including, alas, North Carolina).

Unfortunately, nine states rate an F–that is, these states failed miserably because they have no donation-related measures in place: Alabama, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, and Wyoming.

The tragedy is that none of these donation measures is really controversial–they shouldn’t be so damn hard to pull off. They are simple, reasonable, common sense ways that a state can demonstrate its support for people who help save a life in this way. In fact, not only does encouraging living donation save lives, it reduces costs by reducing the number of people on dialysis (Medicare pays about $80,000 a year per dialysis patient).

With 106,000 people in this country on the national transplant waiting list (most of them needing a kidney), it seems that the very least we can do is remove the barriers to living donation.

For related posts and information on my new book, The Insider’s Guide to Living Kidney Donation, be sure to explore the rest of my website.

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