Reimburse Living Donors’ Lost Pay–and More

Several months ago I was excited to learn that financial assistance for living donors was going to be substantially expanded—encompassing more people and for more kinds of noncovered expenses, like lost wages, childcare, and eldercare. As a living donor and advocate, last year at this time I provided public comment on the subject and followed up with emails to members of Congress. In July the incredible Executive Order on Advancing Kidney Health touted a major expansion of reimbursement for donor expenses, in addition to efforts to improve early detection of chronic kidney disease, encourage medical innovation, and lots more.

The devil is always in the details, which take time. Ever since, I’ve been eagerly awaiting the good news. The current financial eligibility limit, at 300% of poverty line (or $38,000), has long been way too low. Advocates have argued persuasively for increasing that to 500% ($64,000)–ideally 600%–to be able to serve the majority of living donors rather than a small fraction. For donors who don’t have paid sick leave, these extra expenses are often a deal breaker for people who might otherwise volunteer to save a life by donating their kidney.

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The proposal they came back with this week offers just pocket change: a tiny increase in the eligibility cutoff to 350% (or $45,000)!

Also, wait for this: the assistance is still tied to the recipient’s income, not the donor’s. So it does an injustice to both potential donors and recipients by putting the onus on the latter to reimburse the donor for nonmedical expenses (testing and surgery are covered by the recipient’s health insurance, be it private, Medicare, or Medicaid). The government apparently thinks it reasonable that the family of the recipient, desperately trying to find a living donor and incurring all sorts of costs themselves, when they’re facing major surgery, should have to worry about trying to reimburse their potential donor.

There’s another glitch in tying eligibility to the recipient’s income—what about nondirected donors (those who decide to donate to an unknown recipient they may never meet)? They’re out of luck here. Now, wouldn’t you think you would want to roll out the red carpet for these Good Samaritans instead of shutting an aid door in their faces?

The Executive Order was clear in its intention to expand assistance to encourage living donation. So if you’re a donor or are considering donating–or you’re a kidney patient looking for a donor…please email Frank Holloman at donation@hrsa.gov and tell him that HRSA (the federal Health Resources and Services Administration) needs to go much further in supporting living organ donors. Come to think of it, no matter what your connection to living donation is, contact HRSA, please!